A guide to make your time in quarantine as effective (and fun) as possible for your sexual health


While the public practices social distancing, sex can feel like the last thing on people’s minds.


The best way to prevent COVID-19 is to not come into physical contact with someone that doesn’t live with you. However, there are ways that people can protect themselves and connect with their partner(s) while in social isolation.

Following Social Distance guidelines can make maintaining a relationship feel frustrating or creates feelings of loneliness. The best way to prevent COVID-19 is to not come into physical contact with someone that doesn’t live with you. However, there are ways that people can protect themselves and connect with their partner(s) while in social isolation. Here are a few ways to connect with your significant other while self-isolating as well as ways to improve and enhance your sexual health!

How to Connect with your Partner Virtually:

  • Have a movie date! Use a video-chatting platform such as Zoom or Google Hangout and watch a movie through Netflix, Youtube or other streaming service. One party member can share their screen, so it’s almost like watching together.

  • Get dressed or glammed up for a virtual date. Practicing self care and keeping up on hygiene has a positive impact on mental health. Try on something from your closet that makes you feel good and enjoy your virtual date looking your best.

  • Break out your coloring set and have a creative expression session with your partner. Ask them to draw a picture of you or their favorite animal. You might just be impressed by their artistic abilities

  • Treat yourself and make your favorite dish, have your partner do the same and enjoy a virtual dinner-no phones allowed. (Candlelit dining is an additional plus!)


How to get Birth Control (and condoms) at Home:

No time is better than now to research and consider possible birth control options. The best way to prevent pregnancy is abstinence, however if someone chooses to be sexually active there are methods that can greatly reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy. Additionally, access to birth control is easier than ever before thanks to online-delivery services. Birth control pills can now be shipped nearly everywhere in the United States for low-cost or free with some insurance plans. All resources listed below come shipped in discreet, nondescript packaging so your information stays private and personal!

**Speak with a healthcare professional first before using hormonal birth control methods**

Learn more about which method might be right for you and how to get birth control delivered to you by visiting one of the resources below:


U.S Department of Health and Human Services: https://www.hhs.gov/opa/pregnancy-prevention/birth-control-methods/index.html


Planned Parenthood:

https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/birth-control


Nurx:

https://www.nurx.com


The Pill Club:

https://thepillclub.com


Undercover Condoms:

https://www.undercovercondoms.com/about-us.asp


At Home Testing:

The CDC recommends that people who are sexually active get tested every six months. Many STIs do not have symptoms. In fact, the most common symptom is no symptom at all. If you do not know your status on STIs or HIV, now may be a good time to find out in the comfort of your own home! Below are several resources that offer at home STI and HIV testing kits that come discreetly delivered to your door.

**Please note that not every resource may take insurance


Nurx:

https://www.nurx.com/sti-testing


myLAB:

https://www.mylabbox.com


Let’s Get Checked:

https://www.letsgetchecked.com/us/en/complete-std-test/


Learn more about:

Sexually Transmitted Infections

The U=U campaign

PreP

650 E. Algonquin Rd., Ste. 104
Schaumburg, IL 60173
(847) 496-5939
CPYD.coalition@gmail.com
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Funding provided in whole or in part to the Kenneth Young Center by the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH).