The Relationship Between COVID-19 and Mental Health

Written by Brandon Rafidi




In the United States, nearly one in five adults are faced with mental health issues. As individuals throughout the country and world experience these unprecedented times, it is important for everyone to have a firm understanding of the ways in which a global pandemic like COVID-19 can affect a person’s ability to manage their mental well-being.


Along with a public health crisis can come feelings of uncertainty, anxiety, and loneliness for some individuals who have no choice but to quarantine in their homes by themselves. Unfortunately, these circumstances can cause people who are already living with mental disorders to experience a worsening of their symptoms if they do not engage in regular communication with their support system.


Although connecting with others might seem difficult during this pandemic, doing so is crucial to a person’s ability to cope with the new challenges that we all face as a result of COVID-19. For those individuals who are struggling with their mental health, it is important to know that reaching out to loved ones to discuss your situation is a useful tool that can help you to feel connected and supported. Importantly, these interactions can build the framework for your recovery and an improved sense of overall well-being and health.


In addition to contributing to your well-being, engaging in efforts to successfully manage your mental health can also improve your ability to make healthy decisions that relate to your safety with respect to COVID-19. In order to take all of the necessary precautions that will help to reduce the chances that you contract the virus, such as regularly washing your hands and wearing a mask when leaving the home, it is important that you are able to remain calm and think clearly. By remaining connected to the individuals that contribute to a person’s happiness and well-being, it will be easier for them to not only manage their mental health but also to preserve their physical health. The interconnectedness of these two components is more apparent than ever due to the current state of the world, and being aware of this relationship is an important step in the process of remaining healthy.






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Funding provided in whole or in part to the Kenneth Young Center by the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH).